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Quakenet.Org Web-Chat Released

Today, Quakenet.org has announced the release of their new web-based chat client:

“We’re pleased to announce that our brand new webchat client is now out of testing and live for public use. The webchat client is the best way to connect to QuakeNet from a web browser, and offers many many excellent features such as full integration with QuakeNet and our “Q” channel service bot.”

Of course, we decided to take it for a spin.

The client comes up with a nice and simple window:

Webchat Introductory Screen

Webchat Introductory Screen

I assume you know how the next part works :P

Once you’re connected, you’re presented with a simple, but clean interface.

Chat Screen!

Chat Screen!

The interface is minimalist in nature. You have (going from left to right)  the menu button, status window and channels. The options menu is well designed; there are enough features present to enhance basic functionality of the web client, without bombarding the user with things that they would never really use. The status and channel windows are both visually identical to mIRC; excellent for giving users a sense of familiarity.

The online functionality of the client was impressive. You have access to all your basic functions (whois, ctcp, kicks, bans etc.), something which other web-based clients don’t necessarily have all of (such as Mibbit). Although you miss some of the bells and whistles that you would get with a full IRC client (such as text formatting and some nickname menu functions), it’s certainly nothing to scoff at so soon after release, especially since the development team behind it (which you can find on #dev on the network) will be continuing to develop and improve the client as bugs and feature requests make their way to them.

Overall, the webclient released by the Quakenet team is a sound one. It’s an easy-to-use client that serves as a great tool for both those who are new to the realm of IRC and the more experienced users who don’t have access to IRC in locations such as the workplace. You could even go so far as to recommend it as a tutorial ‘tool’ as a way to formally introduce new people to IRC. It has much of the functionality of a full IRC client, as well as a dedicated team to keep it going. It’s a great day for the Quakenet denizens who want to check in from elsewhere in the world!